Fatal Attractions: The Most Dangerously Beautiful Places on Earth

For some reason, we are attracted to places that frighten us. For this reason, this attraction is the dream of adrenaline junkies.

Devil’s Pool, Victoria Falls

When David Livingstone finally saw this giant wall of water in the heart of Africa, he could only name it after the greatest name in his repertoire: Victoria Falls. However, the natives already have a name for it. They call it Mosi-oa-tunya, the smoke that thunders. At 354 feet, it is more than twice the height of Niagra Falls. This is the largest sheet of water in the world, based on surface area and volume, and you can swim three meters from the cliff. The demon pool is formed by eddy where the rocks at the top of the Zambezi wait to be eroded. Daredevils can walk along the narrow basal lanes to swim right on the edge of the waterfall and not fall to their deaths, usually. Every year, some people are dragged to the edge because they misjudge the flow. Still, this is the most beautiful swimming pool you can’t find, and most swimmers survive to approve it.

Death Road, Bolivia

Some attractions may be more dangerous than beautiful, but knowing the risks makes them more attractive (explain that, Darwin!). Camino de las Yungas is Bolivia’s name for volcanic descendants from La Paz, the highest national capital in the world with an altitude of 15,000 feet, to Coroico 4,000 feet below. The ‘Way of Death’, as the tourists call it, is the public road that is actually used, and it is estimated that 200-300 people die every year because of it. This has been a hit with crowds looking for backpackers who pass through the Bolivian Andes. For 50 Bolivians (around seven dollars) you can rent a bicycle and drive a 30-mile route while avoiding traffic, and a 400-foot cliff is on your right. You can also choose to take the new main road. Your call.

Grand Canyon, Arizona

Of all the attractions in the United States, only one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The Grand Canyon is a splendor that can only be done by nature. The Colorado River has sliced ​​billions of years of limestone and sandstone to its current depth. Statistically, the person most likely to die is a young man. By jumping along the rocks to pose for photos or take shortcuts, adolescent indifference can be dangerous. Millions of people are already there, and only around 700 have died, so your chances are pretty good.